Teenage advice on dating

🙂 Yes–Dad’s are incredibly important, and one day I will get my husband to help address a dad’s role in a teenagers life. I’ve been told by a lot of parents that this post absolutely pertains to teen girls as well! I didn’t mean to leave them out, I just don’t have any girls so I didn’t feel qualified to claim that!Subscribe to this blog now and receive a free downloadable document: 7 Weekly Habits to Grow Deeper Relationships with Your Son.Now that my boys are developing into young-version human beings…It’s all making sense. God only knows I’ve messed up enough in every other stage, and I only hope they can forget about my mistakes. Today my son becomes a teenager, and tomorrow he’ll be packing for college (God willing. Between conversations with other moms, plenty of books on the subject, and talking to my boys directly, I have come up with what I think are the eleven most important things… Make them clear and consistent, and have absolute consequences in place for when they break rules. Even the quietest ones will open up when given the chance. They get a lot more of an idea about what is right, wrong, good and bad from what you do than what you say. No, you’ll never be perfect, and you can tell your kid that–but don’t use that fact as an excuse to be lame. If you teach them to speak well of others, make sure you do the same. To listen, or discipline.share a joke, or a hug…you need to be in close proximity to your kids.:)) He won’t forget these years, and neither will I. It happens almost every day, and sometimes many times a day: Teenagers are always changing. Get them alone, in the car or wherever you can, and make it clear that you WANT to hear about their interests, and their lives. This may be my very favorite thing about these years. Believe in him with your heart, and tell him that you do. For those moms that work long hours or cannot be physically involved in your children’s lives, I encourage you to creatively find solutions for this.

The Guttmacher Institute notes that nearly half of American teens are sexually active, and too often this is the result of pressure.

This immaturity, both of experience and emotion, can cause teens to think they are in love when they are in fact infatuated.

This infatuation can cause teens to experience low self-esteem, devastation and depression when the relationship ends.

Kay Ireland specializes in health, fitness and lifestyle topics.

She is a support worker in the neonatal intensive care and antepartum units of her local hospital and recently became a certified group fitness instructor.

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