Dating guild

“Turns out that there’s not a lot of mainstream work in Hollywood for four-foot-two blondes with dwarfism, no matter how talented you are,” she writes.“Funnily enough, I’m actually too tall for a little person in the entertainment industry.I'm not going to do a book called I May Be Little, But I Am Fierce,” she says with a laugh.To make sure the book fully reflected her vision, the reality star had to fight to make it happen.“I didn't really want to mirror my book after anyone else.And I feel like the one thing I didn't want to do was make my book corny.Growing up as a little person was never easy for Jolé, who reveals that she was once excluded from a high school show choir group because of her short stature.

Jolé tells ET that her primary focus is on inspiring others with her story.

She spent at least three hours a day writing and reminiscing about her journey, from growing up as a little person (or LP, as she writes in the book) in Texas to living out her dream “Finding the time was definitely super difficult, but I feel like telling the stories was even harder,” Jolé says of juggling DWTS, motherhood and writing the book.

Sharing these stories – which include being one of the only LPs in her hometown, the discrimination she faced and her struggles to fit in because of her dwarfism, losing her father after a long battle with alcoholism and revealing her own DUI – was very emotional and sometimes embarrassing for the 37-year-old.

“The truth is, once we kissed he could never quite make the leap to the two of us going out on our own together in public,” she writes.

“He insisted he wanted us to be together, but then he would backpedal and say things like, “I feel like I’d be holding my daughter’s hand instead of my girlfriend’s,' which made me feel insecure, like he didn’t think I was good enough.” Jolé reveals that she even considered limb-lengthening surgery because the rejection she felt was so painful, but eventually she made the decision to walk away from the relationship.

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